Career Contribution Award

In cooperation with PMIG, ISCON honors career contributions to the study of social cognition with the

Thomas M. Ostrom Award


Past winners of the award are:


  • 1998
    Robert S. Wyer, Jr.
  • 1999
    E. Tory Higgins
  • 2000
    David L. Hamilton
  • 2001
    Anthony G. Greenwald
  • 2002
    Steven J. Sherman
  • 2003
    Susan T. Fiske & Shelley E. Taylor
  • 2004
    Eliot R. Smith
  • 2005
    Norbert Schwarz & Fritz Strack
  • 2006
    Russell H. Fazio
  • 2007
    Marilynn B. Brewer
  • 2008
    Myron Rothbart
  • 2009
    Donal E. Carlston
  • 2010
    Charles M. Judd & Bernadette Park
  • 2011
    John A. Bargh
  • 2012
    Reid Hastie
  • 2013
    Jim Uleman
  • 2014
    Patricia Devine
  • 2015
    Yaacov Trope
  • 2016
    Rich Petty

Early Career Award

Each year ISCON recognizes the contributions to the study of social cognition by junior scientists.
(6 years post-Ph.D. max)


Past winners of the award are:


  • 2007
    Bertram Gawronski
  • 2008
    Brian A. Nosek & B. Keith Payne
  • 2009
    Melissa J. Ferguson & Jason P. Mitchell
  • 2010
    David M. Amodio
  • 2011
    Robert J. Rydell
  • 2012
    Wilhelm Hofmann
  • 2013
    Nick Rule
  • 2014
    Kristina Olson
  • 2015
    Adam Waytz
  • 2016
    Jonathan Freeman & Kurt Gray

Best Paper Award

Each year, ISCON offers an award for the Best Social Cognition Paper


  • 2004
    Schul, Y., Mayo, R. & Burnstein, E. (2004).
    Encoding under trust and distrust: The spontaneous activation of incongruent cognitions.
    Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 86, 668-679.

  • 2005
    Custers, R., & Aarts, H. (2005).
    Positive affect as implicit motivator: On the nonconscious operation of behavioral goals.
    Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 89, 129-142.

  • 2006
    Cesario, J., Plaks, J. E., & Higgins, E. T. (2006).
    Automatic social behavior as motivated preparation to interact.
    Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 90, 893-910.

  • 2007
    Wheeler, S. C., DeMarree, K. G., & Petty, R. E. (2007).
    Understanding the role of the self in prime-to-behavior effects: The active-self account.
    Personality and Social Psychology Review, 11, 234-261.

  • 2008
    Koo, M., & Fishbach, A. (2008).
    Dynamics of self-regulation: How (un)accomplished goal actions affect motivation.
    Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 94,183-195.

  • 2009
    Sherman, J. W., Kruschke, J. K., Sherman, S. J., Percy, E. J., Petrocelli, J. V., & Conrey, F. R. (2009).
    Attentional processes in stereotype formation: A common model for category accentuation and illusory correlation.
    Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 96, 305-323.

  • 2009
    Smith, E. R., & Collins, E. C. (2009).
    Contextualizing person perception: Distributed social cognition.
    Psychological Review, 116, 343-364.

  • 2010
    Förster, J., & Dannenberg, L. (2010).
    GLOMO sys : A systems account of global versus local processing.
    Psychological Inquiry, 21, 175-197.

  • 2011
    Loersch, C., & Payne, B. K. (2011).
    The situated inference model: An integrative account of the effects of primes on perception, behavior, and motivation.
    Perspectives on Psychological Science, 6, 234-252.

  • 2012
    Inzlicht, M., & Schmeichel, B. J. (2012).
    What is ego depletion? Toward a mechanistic revision of the resource model of self-control.
    Perspectives on Psychological Science, 7, 450-463.

  • 2013
    Gawronski, B., & Cesario, J. (2013).
    Of mice and men: What animal research can tell us about context effects on automatic responses in humans.
    Personality and Social Psychology Review, 17, 187-215.

  • 2014
    Gray, K., Rand, D. G., Eyal, E., Lewis, K., Hershman, S., & Norton, M. I. (2014).
    The emergence of “Us and Them” in 80 lines of code: Modeling group genesis in homogeneous populations.
    Psychological Science, 25, 982-990.

  • 2015
    Mann, T. C., & Ferguson, M. J. (2015).
    Can we undo our first impressions? The role of reinterpretation in reversing implicit evaluations.
    Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 108, 823-849.